Constructivism and the New Social Studies: A Collection of Classic Inquiry Lessons (Charlotte, NC: Information Age, 2018)

Geoffrey Scheurman and Ronald Evans, Editors

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The New Social Studies refers to a flurry of academic and commercial activity during the 1960s and 1970s that resulted in the mass development and dissemination of revolutionary classroom materials and teacher resources. In science as well as social studies, a spirit of “inquiry-based teaching” filled the air during this time, resulting in the development of curricula that were both pedagogically innovative and intellectually rigorous. Constructivism and the New Social Studies contains a collection of classic lessons from some of the most successful projects of the era, providing a resource of exceptional ideas and materials that have stood the test of time.

These revealing artifacts are presented with commentaries from some of the original directors of major projects, including Edwin Fenton, Barry Beyer, and Suzanne Helburn. In addition to American and World History, groundbreaking lessons are represented in Economics, Government, Sociology, and Geography, including the Public Issues Series (Fred Newmann), The Amherst History Project (Richard Brown and Geoffrey Scheurman) and Teaching American History: The Quest for Relevancy (Allan Kownslar, Gerald Ponder, and Geneva Gay), and Man: A Course of Study (Peter Dow). With a Foreword by Jerome Bruner, the volume not only provides a resource of exceptional curriculum ideas and actual materials, it also builds a lucid bridge between the theoretical ideas of constructivism and the pedagogical principles of inquiry learning.

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The Handbook on Teaching Social Issues (Charlotte, NC: Information Age, 2007; Washington, DC: National Council for the Social Studies, 1996)

There’s no book like this one for educators interested in issues-centered teaching. More than 40 experts have contributed articles offering comprehensive coverage of the field of social issues education. In addition to a full examination of objectives and methods, contributors show how social issues can be taught as part of history, geography, the social sciences, and global and environmental studies. The challenges of assessment, curriculum, and effective teacher education are fully explored.

With its teaching ideas and useful resource section, this book is an indispensable addition to your library!

Contributors include: Shirley Engle, Anna Ochoa-Becker, Jack Nelson, Carole Hahn, Byron Massialas, Jeff Passe, Jesus Garcia, Gloria Ladson-Billings, Merry Merryfield, Patricia Avery, Sam Totten, Bill Wraga, Walter Parker, James Shaver, and many more.

Link to Issues Centered Education website: Issues Centered Education